Volume 8, Issue 2, June 2020, Page: 38-42
The Animal Ethic Thoughts in the Eastern and Western Religions and Their Resource Significance
Zhang Yan, Department of Philosophy, School of Public Management, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing, China
Fu Tongtao, Department of Philosophy, School of Public Management, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing, China
Yang Weirong, Department of Philosophy, School of Public Management, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing, China
Received: Jan. 11, 2020;       Accepted: May 9, 2020;       Published: May 28, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijp.20200802.12      View  234      Downloads  85
Abstract
From the perspective of religion, philosophy and science, the animal world is a part of nature, and interacts with the human world to jointly shape the natural world and create the present state of human world outlook. However, the animal ethics in eastern and Western religions have different positions and contents because of their different ideological origins and values. The Abrahamic religions all embody a kind of religious humanitarianism in the relationship between man and animal. Compared with Western religions, Buddhism and Jainism do not embody a clear human centralism position in terms of doctrine, and Taoism also holds a kind of gentle bio-egalitarianism. With modern science development, no matter the human centralism animal ethics in Western religions, or the biological egalitarian animal ethics in Eastern religions, there are some conflicts and fusions on theoretical and practical aspects. Through the comparative study of Eastern and Western religions in animal ethics, we can clarify the differences and integration of animal ethics in the Eastern and Western religious systems, and actively seek the coexistence and development of modern science and technology and religious animal ethics in theory and practice, which has a very important positive value in promoting the harmonious development of human and nature and improving the ecological environment.
Keywords
Animal Ethic, Humanism, Biological Egalitarianism
To cite this article
Zhang Yan, Fu Tongtao, Yang Weirong, The Animal Ethic Thoughts in the Eastern and Western Religions and Their Resource Significance, International Journal of Philosophy. Vol. 8, No. 2, 2020, pp. 38-42. doi: 10.11648/j.ijp.20200802.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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